Monday, 16 September 2013

Baskets galore




We had another visit from the Raşit the basket weaver. Again he was already well into production on our terrace when we woke up.


I really liked this shape mid-construction and thought it would be nice to have a large handle. 



His grandson came along this time to do the leaf stripping but wasn't a very willing apprentice. 


Raşit sells his wares in Bodrum at the Friday market so he works through the week to have 6 or 7 completed baskets ready to offer for sale. 


He's been branching (!) out with new designs this month but hasn't completely abandoned the traditional.  I've got my eye on this splendid olive pickers basket. 

21 comments:

  1. . . there are a couple of families that camp out each year by the main Ortaca road - they make some terrific stuff is useful or decorative as you choose.

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    1. I remember buying basket chairs from the road side in Ortaca - probably 30 years ago.

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  2. Brilliant. Have you had a go at making one yet? Get in some practise because I'll expect you to teach me :-)

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  3. I particularly like the top one. I haven't been aware of baskets here...but i'm in to town today so I'll take a proper look at the market.

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    1. I've called this design "the herb basket"

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  4. Every home should have one (or three) :-)

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  5. I would love to have one :) So nice to see handcraftsman to see in action, would Rasit be around with his baskets in summer time? I would love to get one - or two or three..

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    1. I'm coming to Gatwick in October with an almost empty bag so if you want one or two and you are not too far from the airport , I can bring them .

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  6. B to B, I absolutely love them! Just the kind of traditional arts we love to decorate our house with. But I guess Raşit's grandson is proof that these arts are dying out. So we'd better load up now!

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    1. I don't think he'll be following in his grandfather's footsteps - it was all too much work for him.

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  7. Dear Annie, that last basket really is "splendid." Rasit has so much talent and creativity. And to get to work with his hands to form beauty is the true creator and artist's forte. How did you get to be friends with him? Peace.

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    1. We've know him since we moved to the village in 1992. He used to own the coffee house.

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  8. Lovely baskets! We sometimes get handmade baskets in Selçuk - I have one. But we saw some beauties on the way to Eğidir. I was thinking of buying one on the way home but they were all on the opposite side of the road.

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    1. Where would you put them on the bike - Wear them on your helmets maybe?

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  9. I find buying baskets very hard to resist. If Rasit was in my garden, I don't think I'd let him out on Fridays! Like you, I'm very taken by that last photo...

    Axxx

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    1. I promised myself that I wouldn't buy anything else for the house as we still have stuff in boxes from the move. I'm fighting the urge at present.

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  10. Rasit has so much talent and creativity. And to get to work with his hands to form beauty is the true creator and artist's forte. How did you get to be friends with him? Peace. Travesti

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  11. How fabulous that someone still keeps a handiwork craft....he has so much talent and I love his baskets...especially the 'olive' pickers one.
    I have one of my Mother in Laws baskets that I kept...she use to have a string attached to it and lower it down from the 3rd floor with some money and the guy would take the money and put a loaf of bread into it.

    Take care....

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  12. Wonderful work. I love baskets too and think the olive picker's basket would do very nicely for carrying in logs.

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