Wednesday, 26 June 2013

Finding Keramos


I had no difficulty finding Keramos when I first visited in 1982.  We sailed into the wide bay at Ören, moored at the only jetty, made our way along the only road through the empty fields, came to a small village and ambled over walls and gardens visiting what I remember as quite abundant ruins.  My abiding memory is buying a warm Fanta and packet of biscuits  from a gas-lamp lit grocer shop and eating the paraffin flavoured biscuits as we walked back to the sea.



Ören has grown. The seaside is lined with cafes and and the pebble beach is full of sun beds. The fields  have filled with holiday houses and driving in, the road takes you straight to the sea.  Having not made an early start we arrived at lunch time and after a very hot wander along the front we stopped for a toast and beer on the front. I haven't recommended any restaurants in this blog yet but the Bi Lokma cafe deserves a mention. I love real chips and hate the frozen french fries so when I find a patron who answers the question "Do you have real chips?" with "I have plenty of potatoes so of course I'll make you some" I'm sold.


After lunch, we had to find our way back to the village. Easier said than done.  We now know that on the approach to Ören, after crossing the bridge, we should have taken the left road signposted paraşut yeri, then turned right at the sign to Keremos. Parked at the top of the village and with temperatures touching 36 degrees C we climbed up to find the city walls that clearly mark Keramos out as a Carian town. It is on record that it paid one and a half talents to the Delian League in the fifth century BC and by Roman times it was minting its own coinage and was a titular see of Asia Minor with three bishops mentioned in despatches.


We could see several promising bits of wall from up here and set off downhill to find them. Several times we came to dead ends or closed gates but eventually found ourselves by this wall of unusual polygonal shaped stones.


There are tempting glimpses of what may be underground


One day the archaeologists' trenches will tell us what is here. 


The modern cemetery provided an interesting contrast between the ancient sarcophagi and modern graves. It may have been in constant use for over 2500 years.


Not all recent additions are as sympathetically positioned


Either my memory is faulty or a lot of the site has been built on or moved elsewhere. There are better preserved ruins of a temple of Zeus in the hills above but they will have to be saved for a cooler day. 



One photo I can't resist putting in is the interior of Municipality Building. 


The contrast between the shiny white marble and green astroturf was quite mind altering, especially as the building was completely empty. (I made the mistake of visiting during the lunch hour).
Despite the heat, we had fun finding what is left above ground at Keramos but the remains don't merit a trip specially to see them. 


24 comments:

  1. Still looks like a fun outing! I loved discovering all the ancient sites in Turkey!

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    1. The looking for was more exciting than the finding in this case.

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  2. You were brave for this visit at that heat; had visited Oren ages ago, looks very developed now.It would be really interesting see what else there under the ground, hope soon. - And the real chips sounds great to me too, Bi Lokma is a good find :)

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    1. I don't think we'll attempt any more walks until October.

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  3. Not heard of Keramos before. Another place for me to look up :-)
    I love the first photo; the Carian Tomb next to the gnarled olive tree. Saw a lot of these tombs in Alinda but all of them had been opened.

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    1. All the ones here had either lost their roves of had a big hole in the side.

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  4. Hi BtoB! Thought of you yesterday as Ann S came to visit! re chips, in our family we are especially in love with Assos potatoes and loyally they all think that Mum's chips made with said potatoes, are best!
    Your area is just full of amazing archaeological finds! Super!

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  5. Real chips - always a winner. Loving the outdoor gym so carefully positioned! :)

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  6. Yes, yes. What a wonderful view to admire whilst doing your cardio exercises!

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  7. Dear Annie, here in the states we don't have digs that take archaeologists back so many centuries. In Illinois there is the 13th century Cahokia Native American mounds to visit but I don't know what else there is. That's something I need to explore and your blog makes me want to do that. Thank you. Peace.

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    1. Bronze Age is relatively modern here.

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    2. Dear Annie, Wow! Peace.

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  8. B to B, Once again, I thank you for educating us and reminding us of what archaeological treasures abound in Turkey. (BTW, I think that Turkish potatoes are the best in the world.)

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  9. And why is it, with such wonderful architectural photos - and some bizarre pink piping - that all I can think about now is CHIPS! Curses, Annie! I'm seriously trying to lose some weight but I am totally addicted to good - that is, real - chips. I guess walking around in all that heat did mean you could eat them (drool) with a clear conscience. Are you still going to that lovely gym you showed us in an early post?
    Axxx

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  10. You are on one of my 'dream' missions.....I love exploring those areas. Unfortunately whoever I'm with like my Family and the odd friend they with have no patience to explore around these areas or are extremely tired and HOT....to look further.
    Haven't been to this area but I'm saving your posts so when I come next time I'll try and visit these sites...so amazing.
    Thanks for sharing these posts...so educating and interesting.
    Probably Jake is having a fun time exploring.

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    1. Jake stayed in the shade for this one as it was too hot.

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  11. now that you've done all the perspiring and taken wonderful photos, I feel that I've been to Keramos...thank you for the day trip!!!

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    1. There was a lot of perspiring but luckily the grocers now have electricity and cold drinks.

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  12. Super photos of your trip comparing past with present. I love the thought of a country with so much history almost casually dotted around in the midst of modern life. Sarcophagi and chips. :-)

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