Monday, 12 August 2013

From Bush to Basket



I finished Thursday's post with a picture of two baskets woven by our friend, Raşit. While I was in Greece, he'd kindly brought over a large supply of fresh vegetables from his garden to make sure my husband wasn't starving in my absence and over a tea or two, Teo and he had perused some art and craft catalogues to get ideas for basket designs.  He'd just made these two out of fresh olive branches and wanted our opinion.  Explaining the concept of "less is more" we got him to agree to ditch the plastic beads and I was keen for him to describe the weaving process. Now I am back in the land of "no problem - everything is possible",  I shouldn't have been surprised when Raşit said he would be at our house in the morning to show me how it is done. 



By the time we surfaced the next day, Raşit was installed on our terrace having collected his raw material and stripped it of leaves.  I just had time to throw on some clothes and grab my camera to record the first incisions.


It soon became obvious that two hands are not sufficient for the initial stages and at least one foot has to join in.


Jake couldn't believe his eyes as visitors don't usually turn up with an armful of sticks. Luckily for our basket, he was content with stealing just two.


I had to be content with watching and taking photos as having a go myself wasn't an option but as the basket took shape I was already imagining myself weaving garden chairs, bird cages,  trellis work and  and plant holders.


I can't wait to get started on my own baskets but as I'm off to Greece again on Wednesday, I'll have to be patient until September. 


In less than 3 hours, this bush was converted to this fruit bowl which is sitting proud on my dining table. 


23 comments:

  1. . . in this over-commodified world this is the way to go - less is more!

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  2. I have basket weaving instructions for you, if you like. It's for miniatures, but the principle is the same. The fruit basket is wonderful! Totally agree about the beads...

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    1. Yes please - I watched carefully but I'm sure I missed some important tips

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  3. Good idea to get rid of the beads. The pretty little basket needs no embellishment.

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  4. I love baskets. Beautiful and useful. I wish I could weave them, but my arthritic hands wouldn't be able to cope. Looking forward to seeing the results of your attempts.

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    1. If you look carefully, you'll see Raşit is missing a thumb and index finger on one hand. Come over in September and give it a go

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    2. OK...I'll give it a go. Just let me know when...thankyou xx

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  5. Brilliant, just brilliant.J

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  6. Yes less is definitely best! So simple, but beautiful!

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    1. I wanted to keep the leaves on the basket.

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  7. A new business venture for Teo???? Kath - now back in the UK : (

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    1. I can't believe you got back so quickly

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  8. B to B, I'm so glad you posted this as I loved the last picture in your previous post. The colors were so beautiful. What? Greece again? Iyi yolculuklar but come back soon!

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    1. Won't be away for so long this time. Thanks

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  9. Dear Annie, with this story and these photographs, we have a perfect example of what you said--"Less IS more." Peace.

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  10. The basket looks great with the peaches.

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    1. I like photographing things on glass tables as they appear to float.

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  11. Wonderful! I adore baskets and to see one appearing like this is such a joy. How lovely and how great that you have such a generous and talented neighbour!
    Axxx

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  12. That is gorgeous! Like Annie I love baskets and have often brought them back from Mediterranean countries as holiday souvenirs. How marvellous to try making your own, though i bet they take much strength and manual dexterity as well as tough skin to handle those sticks.

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