Monday, 9 December 2013

The Future View


Until very recently, Bodrum was not an easy place to access by land.  Several hours had to be spent on the road from Izmir or Dalaman before we eventually got our own international airport. One of the joys of the trek to Bodrum was finally getting to Güvercinlik and being able to see this beautiful blue sea and knowing that there were only 20 or so minutes left before the road would head downhill and the magnificent castle would come into view.  It  was a trip I never tired of as the deep blues and vibrant turquoise would lift even the heaviest heart.


The sea is still just as blue but I wonder how many generations will enjoy the same excitement as they drive out of  Güvercinlik.  The first 2 kms is already blighted by an ugly hotel construction that is several stories higher than legally allowed and has been a concrete shell for the past two years.


Further down the road, newly-built hotels feel it is their right to isolate  the view for the sole enjoyment of their own paying guests and we passers-by are left to look at stone or brick walls


or densely planted conifers. 


The entrances of these same hotels suggest that they are places where appreciation of nature is not high on the agenda...


... and where gilding the lily is the order of the day.


So I shouldn't really be surprised that just after the sign telling us that we are about to catch sight of Bodrum (a sign which in my opinion is also an unnecessary detraction from the view) ....


this construction has just sprung up.  I assume it will soon have walls to completely block the view. 


There are many examples of "golden goose extermination" on this peninsula but this has to be one of the best/worst. 

If you are wondering who The Fisherman of Halicarnassos is click here: http://backtobodrum.blogspot.com/2013/04/eight-famous-residents-help-you-plan.html

23 comments:

  1. Your description of traveling into Bodrum was so vivid, I felt like I was right there with you. I have never had the opportunity to visit Bodrum but hopefully one day I will!

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    1. Hope you come soon before we pave it over.

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  2. I also feel a thrill upon reaching Guvercinlik and that wonderful view, that is what you can still see of it. I agree with you, all these buildings and walls will eventually shut it out altogether. I also detest that sign on the entrance to Bodrum...totally unnecessary and an eyesore.

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  3. B to B, From what I've read, I think the Fisherman of Halikcarnassos may be turning in his grave. I always wonder what it will take to stop this (since we also have our share of golden goose killing going on in Istanbul). But they say that tourism has increased 11% this past year, and that's with the Gezi Park protests going on. So I'm at a loss.

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    1. The kind of tourist is changing from those that appreciated the natural beauty to those who never leave their gold pillared hotel.

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  4. It's a real shame. Relentless development is turning the Bodrum Peninsula (and other parts of the coast) into a Spanish-style costa. It's a case of jam today.

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    1. We've been saying the same since the late 90s - I'm afraid Mammon is not so keen on wide open spaces.

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  5. Dear Annie, and I suppose that there in Turkey as here in the United States, all this is done in the name of progress! Peace.

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  6. We share your sentiments entirely Annie. Having 'driven' around parts of the peninsula this year we were saddened to see how Bodrum has merged in Gumbet, into Bitez and even into Ortakent. The theatre is now wedged in between a row of shops and it was almost impossible to photograph the beautiful castle from the approach road. Glad we have our memories of how it used to be....

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    1. It's difficult to find a gap to stop and go for a swim now.

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  7. Just saw this in todays Zamam -- The destruction of illegal buildings in towns near the Aegean resort city of Bodrum will start today with the demolition of one hotel and the partial demolition of another, according to reports in the Turkish media. The Thor Hotel in the Torba township will be torn down, as will some sections of the Blue Dreams Otel, also located in Torba. .... Jay

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    1. Will it really happen. The buildings in Guvercinlik have had demolition orders on them for over 20 years but I only remember about 6 being knocked down.

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    2. If not, maybe the widespread expansion will stop. There's a big hotel being built near us in Koyunbaba .. blighting the landscape that first attracted us to that area... don't know if that's on a list too ... it should be. It's huge and right on the coastal area, and I'm sure that stretch of land doesn't have the infrastructure to support it.

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  8. In case my previous comment couldn't make it - loved your Guvercinlik photos and never understand building glittery pillars rather than preserving this natural beauty, hope they realise and appreciate it - and I can't wait to make it to Bodrum this summer : )

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    1. I didn't receive your earlier comments Ozlem, and I noticed that you didn't get a couple of mine on your blog.

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  9. What a glorious view and what a crime to destroy it like this. I've never been to Turkey, but I've seen the same happen in so many coastal towns elsewhere in recent years. So sad....

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    1. The view wil be their but we won't be able to see it from the road which is such a shame.

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  10. Hi BtoB! I thought RTE was knocking down hundreds of illegal structures in the Bodrum area? The structures in your pics are just horrendous - that natural beauty is being ruined by these eyesores.

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    1. Hi Claudia, the first two hotels that were meant to be "knocked down" yesterday got a stay of execution from the courts in Mugla.

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  11. Crickey, local urbanists should be hung upside down off the nearest lamp post with their knickers over their heads for that mess. It's the same problem on the French coastline, and those who don't pull strings with friends at the local town council bide their time as the endless French administration goes through the movements...

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