Wednesday, 26 March 2014

Pine pollen - Nuisance or Miracle


It's that time of year again. Everything in the garden is covered in pine pollen.  Anything that was white or cream last week is now a streaky pale lemon colour.  The meter of rainwater in the pool is rather prettily swirled with yellow oily blobs, but I know the sticky tidemark will take a lot of scrubbing when the time comes.  When I first started sailing in Turkey, I thought that this oil slick was the result of yellow paint being thrown into the sea because I couldn't imagine nature creating such a viscous, unappetising water pollution.  For many years I've been openly cursing this golden powder that covers us, but using it as a good excuse to put off a Spring clean, as any work in the garden or dusting in the house is undone once the trees start producing.

video

Despite living with this phenomenon for over 30 years I have never thought to do any research - until this week and I've been completely amazed by the properties of pine pollen.  Am I the only person in the world who has been tipping this golden dust into the bin, while a 50g packet is selling for a minimum of $15?  Just think of the income I've thrown away.


Pine pollen has been used as an anti-aging food in China and Korea for 1000s of years but it's only recently that research has shown why.  This is a brief summary of the information available. The plant produces sterols that are close enough to our hormones to have a similar effect when taken by humans. It is an androgenic herb which will increase our four main androgens; androsterone,androstenedione, DHEA and testosterone. It contains Vitamins A,B1,B2,B3,B6, folic acid, D, E plus most of the minerals and over 20 amino acids, making it a complete protein.  It is claimed to increase immune and endocrine function, reduce sensitivity to pain, lower cholesterol, stimulate rejuvenation,  and act as an anti-inflammatory, anti- arthritic and anti-viral. Those interested in its testosterone increasing properties should make it into a tincture by infusing with alcohol. A commonly found recipe suggests adding the pollen to equal amounts of vodka at the new moon, leaving until the next new moon and then straining through an unbleached coffee filter.  Made into a cream it's said to improve eczema, acne and impetigo.  The rest of us can just add the raw pollen to our food.   So far I haven't found any dosages mentioned so I don't recommend trying this at home without further research.  Next year I won't be complaining at the mess, I'll be out with a large stick and bag collecting my own supply of "miracle dust".

19 comments:

  1. B to B, Sounds like the perfect panacea. You could set up your own stand in the market next year. I particularly like the vodka infused recipe - it's bound to make you feel better!

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    1. The tincture is strictly for the gentlemen unless in training as a female body builder.

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  2. Wow I am so glad you posted this. It's now answered a couple of things that have been puzzling me. Years ago I was given two small jars of what I now recognise from your post as being pine pollen. I had no idea what it was, and nor did my husband. So it sat in the cupboard for years and was eventually thrown away. If only I'd known.

    Also, we had rain yesterday and it was very windy. This morning I went down to sweep the puddles from the driveway and they were all streaked with what I thought was yellow paint. Couldn't make it out. We've been putting kirec on the house but that's white, so it wasn't that. We don't have any pine trees near us but I guess the pollen was blown up this way by the wind.

    So glad I know now what it is...thanks xx

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    1. I'm glad you think it looks like paint too.

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  3. Our Turkish builders (when we were in France) used to bring this back for my husband when they had been home on visits...and also wild honey.
    They said both would boost his immune system.

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    1. Are you sure it was his immune system they said it would boost?

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  4. . . tourists on boat trips around Dalyan get into hysterics every year as they are convinced there has been a chemical spill or an invasion from Mars!

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    1. Understandable as it's so oily. If they knew that it's a supposed elixir of youth - they'd be rubbing it all over instead of the mud

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  5. One of Mother Nature's little miracles but knowing this doesn't make the pool scrubbing any more palatable, I'm sure!

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    1. Maybe we could advertise ourselves as a spa and rub tourists around the edge of the pool.

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  6. When we visited the 'Marmaris Honey House' last year we were treated to a little taster of pollen - looked like space dust and had a weird taste! If anyone is passing that way it's an interesting place and free to walk around .... http://www.marmarisbalevi.com.tr/en

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  7. Airborne gold - now that's a possible name for your new business. :-)

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  8. I wasn't aware of any of that - you have a treasure at your back yard! :)

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    1. We'll have to think of a recipe to put it in.

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  9. Well my video didn't last long - sorry I uploaded via Google videos but this is obviously the same as You Tube and is therefore banned to view in Turkey. I hope those of you outside will still be able to see it.

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    1. It's still visible over here, BtoB. I can't believe the restrictions you're having to put up with. Where will it end?

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    2. That's good to know P. Thank you

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