Monday, 19 May 2014

Mulberries at Gambilya


There is a bumper crop of mulberries this year and everyone is searching for ways to use up this juicy fruit. One friend is brewing mulberry wine and  I'm looking forward to tasting and writing about the resulting brew. Mulberries are ideal for sherbets and cordials. Most recipes call for the berries to be boiled with sugar and water but Lale, at Gambilya Cafe in Bodrum showed me a "raw" recipe.  The amounts are vague but approximately 2 cups of berries, 1 cup of sugar and 1 cup of lemon juice are mixed in a glass jar, which is shaken daily and left in the garden for 4 days.  The mixture is then passed through a fine sieve and bottled.  I would keep the bottles in the fridge, but I'm sure they won't be around for long as the syrup mixed with 4 parts water makes a very refreshing long drink. I think the addition of a shot of vodka and plenty of crushed ice would also go down well after the sun dips below the yardarm. She also makes a cordial using purple basil instead of berries, which, once diluted, produces the delicate pink liquid in the glass on the left. 



I haven't mentioned many ( if any) restaurants in this blog, but Gambilya is worth a recommendation as Lale and Selahattin have created a little green oasis in the centre of Bodrum, where healthy, clean
natural foods can be enjoyed in a peaceful, almost rural atmosphere. We hold our writing group here every two weeks, and each time we are treated to a different cake or dessert, created with minimum or zero sugar and lots of seasonal fruits.  Effort is made to use only locally sourced products and their lunch and dinner menus feature home cooked dishes which aren't found in other restaurants. 
They also have excellent wifi so if you are looking for a quiet spot to catch up on your correspondence over a herb tea or coffee, Gambilya is the ideal spot. 



24 comments:

  1. B to B, Thanks for the recipe. Sounds like a great summer drink, with and without the vodka. If we ever make it to Bodrum, we'll try to make it to Gambilya.

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    1. October is a good time to visit. Hope you make it one day.

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  2. Thank you for the recipe...when I'm in Turkey I'll try this for sure. I do have a Mulberry tree on my front lawn... it is a good bird and squirrel feeder, my husband said it is a different kind of tree then in Turkey.. The critters love hanging around that tree all the time....I love when the Red Cardinal or Blue Jays coming flying around with their gorgeous colours.
    I must say I never had any Mulberry anything really till I went to Turkey...we don't have any here..... usually I get Mulberry juice and Ice Cream which I love in Izmir. Enjoyed this post....have a great day :-)

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    1. I wasn't a great fan of mulberries but this sherbet is tasty

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  3. I remember having karadut şerbeti as a kid growing up in İzmir ... cold and refreshing.

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    1. Thanks for popping by Erin. I hope to meet up with you if you drop anchor in Bodrum again.

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  4. Sounds delicious (especially with a shot of Istanblue!) ... and thanks for the tip about Gambilya, will have to pay it a visit. I hadn't realized you were still doing your writing group... how's is it going ...

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    1. Writing group is just about to enter our summer break. We've had a great time

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  5. . . same here - fruit coming out of our ears! The vodka bit sounds like a constructive use of Nature's Bounty!

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    1. The purple basil syrup would also make an interesting cocktail

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  6. Hello,

    Mulberries sound so luxurious and decadent, perhaps because they feature only rarely in the UK and they are never to be found here in Hungary. Your long drink sounds delicious and the dash of Vodka is sure to add a little something special!

    The home cooking at your restaurant sounds perfect. What more can one ask for than locally sourced ingredients cooked with passion?

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    1. Mulberry sorbet is another winner.

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  7. Sounds fabulous. With the vodka, of course. I'll be keeping a close eye on my neighbour's mulberry tree from now on.

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    1. Most mulberries end up on the ground. It seems such a shame.

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  8. Mulberry wine? Sounds right up my alley!

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    1. Hope to share a glass with you soon.

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  9. Another neat spot to visit, many thanks for that. I do love Mulberry, though hard to get here, enjoy for me too : )

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    1. It's in a back street so only locals eat here. I think you'll enjoy talking to Lale.

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  10. Must check this place out next time Im in Bodrum, i LOVE mulberries :)

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  11. Look for the club with the massive chandelier and take the road beside it.

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  12. I have a load of mulberries now...so that syrup sounds perfect.

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  13. The drinks look very refreshing!

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  14. Very pretty place - even better if the food is good. The mulberry syrup sounds very interesting, though I haven't seen mulberries in this area...I'm waiting for the cherries at the moment! They don't get chance to be anything other than popped straight in the mouth, although I promised my mum some more of my cherry conserve. Axxx

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  15. Your mulberry cordial sounds delicious and I wish i had some mulberries to try it. Have you thought of using them in a sorbet, as an alternative to ice-cream? As for Gambilya it looks exactly like my kind of place. All I need now is a visit to Bodrum to try it out. :-)

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