Thursday, 11 September 2014

My First Lime in Bodrum



This post is for Kath and Dave, our globe trotting, camper-van driving friends.  When they departed last year, to return to real life in Surrey, they left us the money to buy a lime tree. This I duly did and yesterday I picked my first home grown lime.  These tasty green fruit are hard to come by in Bodrum, and impossible to find in the village so the possibility of being self sufficient in the next few years is a wondrous concept.  We celebrated our harvest with the best gin and tonic of the year.  The next lime I  pick shall be kept in the deep freezer and grated sparingly into Thai curries or desserts. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for the coriander seeds and lemon grass plonked in the garden earlier this week.




Kath and Dave may no longer be driving around Europe, the van has been exchanged for a MG, but Kath hasn't given up blogging. Cakes by Kath is her new blog, showcasing the magnificent birthday cakes she makes for friends and family. 


22 comments:

  1. Ooooh. Where did you find the tree?

    We miss our limes.

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    1. Welcome Arzu, yes, you can't beat a green mandarin for a truly Bodrum CinTonik.

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  3. At Kaktus Cenneti, on the main road to Bodrum, just before the turning to Mumcular.

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    1. This relpy is for Omentide, which somehow went in the wrong place

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  4. . . have you thought of starting mail-order lime tree business? I wouldn't mind a bit of a mark-up!

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    1. I think you can already buy lime trees mail order, Liz below did.

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  5. Dear Annie, that lime looks so scrumptious to me! I so love lime juice in water and key lime pie. And to have a lime tree outside the window. What a joy. Peace.

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    1. Oh I had completely forgotten about Key lime pie.

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  6. Ahhh brilliant news, so glad it has borne fruit for you. We are house sitting at the moment in a Thames side house (rental drama ongoing!) with grapes hanging from a çardak and a little fruiting lime tree on the patio - if we closed our eyes we could almost believe we are out there with you! Şerefe....

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    1. I wish you could be here. We said a big cheers to you and Dave.

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  7. Your lime looks better than ours! We have two trees. Last year loaded with limes but very small.This year not so many so maybe be bit bigger? Have just taken on a Tamarind, also with loads of baby fruit, so looking forward to tasting.

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    1. You inspired me to try and get a lime tree. Ours had lots of little fruit when we bought it but these all fell off. It now has seven or eight good size fruit which is great for the first year. It also has been watered nightly by the automatic irrigation.

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  8. Brilliant.... and you didn't have to wait years until it fruited...fantastic.

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  9. B to B, We're jealous!! We have a Canadian friend here who is growing her own (limes, that is) but the tree is still a baby. We buy them at the market but they're expensive. What we love them in is our guacamole salad which also requires cilantro but lo and behold, the market guys have begun to carry kışnış during a part of the summer. So we had both the limes and cilantro - the salad was delicious. Congratulations on your lime tree.

    BTW, today, a guy selling küdret narı was in the market today and I had to get some after reading your blog. Of course, I was a little nervous about making it but he just told me to whirl it up in the food processor and store it under olive oil which I did. He said 'İlaç ilaç!' and added that it would be good to take as medicine in about 6 months. (I imagine not that long!) Anyway, we'll see. Thanks for the tip.

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    1. Where did my reply disappear to? What did I say ? I hope my cilantro takes. I only grew enough for 3 meals at the beginning of the year. My lemon grass has lots of roots and i can't decide the best place to plant it as I know it grows very bushy. Im sure you can use the kudret nar straight away.

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  10. Many congrats BB, being a lime and lemon fan, I wish I could do that too - failed to grow my lemon tree, I am blaming the weather - enjoy. Indeed Kath's cakes look gorgeous.

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  11. I can't grow any citrus in the village, so I'm really happy the lime tree is happy in the Bodrum garden.

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  12. We have "green lemons" in Ankara. They look and smell like limes, but taste more like lemons. Limes are available at some markets, but for a hefty price!

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