Friday, 26 October 2012

Mountain Goats

The white goats were very popular so I'm going with a black goat this time.



With one Atheist and one Anglican in our household, Kurban Bayram (Sacrifice Holiday) doesn't get a look in.  In our past life in Bodrum, nearly every family slaughtered a sheep, ram or cow in their garden or on their door step and the streets did literally run with blood at this festival. While we were away a new law was passed designating registered slaughter areas so it is now easier to avoid the gory sights.  (We did see a few garden executions yesterday, but the Jandarma were in attendance at one, so the message will eventually get through).  Rather than killing a goat, we spent Bayram trying to emulate a goat and did a bit of mountain rambling. 


This was Jake's first serious archaeological hike. From the look on his face, he seems to know that this is going to be his fate for at least the next decade.  (I recognize the expression - I used to see it on my daughter just before she said "Oh no Mum - not more stones").


First we introduced him to an expert so he could see what was expected of him. 


Then it was a scramble to the top of the 4th century BC sanctuary at Labranda






This is such an impressive site in the mountains above Milas that I'll give it its own post, sans goats, tomorrow.



19 comments:

  1. I always stay in the house at Kurban Bayram, having witnessed some botched and unprofessional slaughters in the early years. I think the message is gradually getting through. I did sit outside yesterday and expected to hear something at least..but nothing.

    I love goats. I'd really like one in our garden. It would keep the weeds down. Unfortunately it would probably demolish the fruit trees too!

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    1. We couldn't understand why there were so many cars at the entrance to our village yesterday until we realised that they were parked outside the designated butchery area. It was packed until late into the evening.

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  2. Between you and Ayak, I have learned agreat deal today, about Kurban Bayram.......and I think I would have stayed inside today rather than risk seeing something I would regret. Your excursion looks wonderful, and I suspect Jake is going to love going on these trips. He is beautiful.J.

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    1. I remember there being an outcry in London a few years ago when someone slaughtered a goat on the street on Kurban Bayram. Somethings are best done behind closed doors. However, as a meat eater, I can't complain.

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  3. Hello, I so look forward to your posting tomorrow and I hope you'll have close-up photographs of that rock dwelling. Peace.

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    1. I don't have any better photos I'm afraid. It's a rock cut tomb. They must have used ladders to get into it because this is as close as we could get.

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  4. I read that, every year, thousands of people suffer injuries (some serious) from the botched slaughter in back gardens and dark alleys. Not much consolation for the hapless sheep!

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    1. There have been over 4,000 reported cases of "kurban accidents!" this year.

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  5. We had a Turkish builder when in France and he and his friends would buy sheep from a local farmer.
    How all this squared with EU rules on slaughter I do not know...nor how many were put down as 'died' rather than 'sold' in the farm accounts.
    He always gave us a shoulder joint, which was most kind of him.

    He also told us that it was not urban myth but true that people in the largely ethnic tower block suburbs were slaughtering sheep in their baths.

    But what else, he said with disgust, would you expect of Arabs!

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    1. Slaughter in the bath! I wish you hadn't told me this.

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  6. I've been nominated for the Expat Blog Awards 2012 and when i visited the site I saw that you have also been nominated. Exciting isn't it? Just like being nominated for an Oscar hehe!

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    1. Have you got your acceptance speech ready?

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  7. We're very much looking forward to your next post. We love Kurban Bayram for its warm, family solidarity feeling but we feel like you do. What's the best thing to do on this holiday? Go out on a walk! How perfect.

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    1. Going for a long walk is the best thing to do every day.

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  8. OMG!!! I can't take this Holiday, it grosses me out. I was in Turkey once and was just sick and cried all day for this feast. They also made a designated area in Toronto for this horrible feast..... My husband does not go at all.
    If my dog saw that black goat ...she would have chased it right to the end. Can hardly wait for your post on your archaeological hike. Congrats!!! for being nominated.

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    1. My husband hates kurban bayram too. I'm OK with it.

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  9. Your post and Ayak's have had me Googling to find out more about Kurban Bayram. Now I can see why a walk in those impressive mountains and to that amazing site would always be my choice too. Now to read the next post....:-)

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